How to write an article english language gcse question

And when time is tight, it seems we are even more willing to compromise our waistlines for a little bit of what we fancy — fast fatty food.

article gcse example

How you can make your writing more speechy. Those biographical bylines, by the way, seem to love pairs of experiences or triples. Where can they find out more? No longer would an editor ask you for a certain number of words.

How to write a leaflet gcse

Fast food is packed with fat and obesity contributes to a range of health issues - most significantly heart disease and depression. Pampered and at risk of being smothered? Possibly spend the last bit of your paragraph as a trailer for what might happen next. You can see from this one that if you enjoyed the article about wolves, you might want to read the book. Find some quotes. These are useful in print as well as online, and useful in all sorts of transactional writing as an ending. Truth be told, in the past, articles fizzled out more often than they came to a kind of conclusion.

Emma Lee is a child psychologist, author and writer. These are useful in print as well as online, and useful in all sorts of transactional writing as an ending.

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It seems that people have simply got out of the habit of cooking. No longer would an editor ask you for a certain number of words. The rhetorical question in the opening paragraph encourages the reader to challenge the topic. You would expect the article to go on to explore how we can eat healthily and to conclude with an explanation of how easy it is to do this. Truth be told, in the past, articles fizzled out more often than they came to a kind of conclusion. Be aware that what comes in your article may have different purposes. Articles are usually written in Standard English , but colloquial sayings or phrases might be used to emphasise a point. Fast food equals fat A staple part of twenty-first century British home-life is the weekly takeaway treat: finger-licking burgers, sticky ribs and crispy chicken wings are, for many, the normal Friday night feast. For many of your tasks, being a teenager actually qualifies you to talk and to have a voice. Editorials have no such requirement. The rest was filler. The final paragraph uses quotations from an expert to add credibility to the argument. The second summarises my view. Pampered and at risk of being smothered?

I also mentioned anxiety directly. The order of your ideas was a pyramid hierarchy — start with the who-what-when-where and add the why and how. Without a sense of adventure or ability to take risks, the next generation are in danger of growing up filled with unresolved anxiety or, worse, constantly seeking thrills that put their lives in jeopardy.

It could be persuasive or it could be argumentative. So, how am I going to end my own article for our fictional broadsheet newspaper? Who is involved?

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AQA GCSE English Language Paper 2 writing tasks: speech and article