A comparison of huck and jim in the novel huckleberry finn

Jim in huckleberry finn

As the novel continues, we find that the structure of Mr. Huck is able to rescue himself to the shore and meets the Grangerfords. At this point at the latest, the attentive reader has to notice that there must be more to the person of Huck than just his function as kind of a stock character, representing the comic figure of a young, uneducated boy that runs away from home to experience some adventures. When Tom arrives in the story, he immediately begins acting as a schemer. A good proof for this assumption is the way in which he tries to play games with Jim. Here, Huck makes the emotional choice of going along with whatever his trusted friend Tom wants to do, without considering the consequences. The book appeals to them only as a quest filled with danger and narrow escapes. Huck can easily be seen as the morally correct character. Huck, who was born in poverty and has lived on the margins of society ever since, speaks in a much rougher, more uneducated-sounding dialect than the speech Tom uses. For the first time the conscience employs not only secular, but also religious arguments in the matter of Jim, as Henry Nash Smith remarks. Tom is the constant, his immaturity not changing from the beginning to the end of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, while Huck is the changing variable. The gaunt and severe Miss Watson is the most prominent representative of the hypocritical religious and ethical values Twain criticizes in the novel. Especially in the beginning of the book Huck tries to behave in conformity to the social community around him, but never quite succeeds. Grangerford about Miss Sophia, Huck has, at least temporarily, sided with emotional decision making, but his regrets show that he is still not certain of his side in the conflict. James Cox argues that Tom does what he does solely for the sake of adventure Cox

Huck, who was born in poverty and has lived on the margins of society ever since, speaks in a much rougher, more uneducated-sounding dialect than the speech Tom uses. In chapter 16 Huck quoted his conscience in direct speech, as if he is not responsible for what it says, whereas in chapter 31 he paraphrases these admonitions and includes them into his own discourse.

Especially in the first 15 chapters of the novel, Huck cannot mentally separate himself from Tom and society. A sense of morality could be derived from what society says is right, but Huck only cares that Jim is his friend. Twain also uses his child protagonist to dramatize the conflict between societal or received morality on the one hand and a different kind of morality based on intuition and experience on the other.

The two young lovers do not care about feud, and only want to be together. At this point at the latest, the attentive reader has to notice that there must be more to the person of Huck than just his function as kind of a stock character, representing the comic figure of a young, uneducated boy that runs away from home to experience some adventures.

differences between huck and jim

Just as the Mississippi would inevitably carry Huck and Jim to New Orleans where Miss Watson had wanted to send Jim anywayescape from the evils inherent in humanity is never truly possible. In this context it will also be worthwhile to take a look at the language used by Huck during this time of inner conflict.

Pap represents both the general debasement of white society and the failure of family structures in the novel. Here, Huck makes the emotional choice of going along with whatever his trusted friend Tom wants to do, without considering the consequences.

huck finn compare and contrast essay

In Huckleberry Finn, Tom serves as a foil to Huck: imaginative, dominating, and given to wild plans taken from the plots of adventure novels, Tom is everything that Huck is not.

The armed men believe Huck and leave after giving them 40 dollars in gold. By contrast, the eponymous hero of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is an emotionally driven character who follows his inner sense of morality. Clearly the two are meant to act as foils.

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SparkNotes: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Character List